First They Came for the Transgender People…

New York journalist Ari Paul warns that people who care about ‘enforcing’ hateful laws of LGBT people won’t stop at just bathrooms. And they won’t stop with LGBT people, either.

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Hari Nef in ‘Transparent’

The hysteria over transgender bathrooms is reaching such a fever pitch that even Americans who aren’t transgender are getting hurt by it.

A Connecticut woman alleged earlier this month that she was harassed by Wal-Mart shoppers because, with her boyish appearance, she was mistaken for a transgender person headed for the women’s bathroom. “You are not supposed to be here!” she was told. “You need to leave!”

The incident is haunting for a few reasons. One is that the woman was not even part of the transgender community, the group usually thought to be the victims of the so-called bathroom bills that force trans people, in states like North Carolina, to use a restroom that doesn’t correspondent to the gender with which they identify. Another is that this happened in a state where such a law doesn’t exist. That brings us to the biggest problem: Regular citizens deputized themselves to enforce an invented standard of what a woman is supposed to look like in public.

This incident, coupled with the troubling trends of anti-Muslim, anti-Semitic and sexist outbursts from the supporters of the possible next American president, Donald Trump, is a window into the political mood our country is headed toward. That mood should be deeply worrisome not only to transgender Americans or to transgender American Jews, but to the American Jewish community writ large.

Martin Niemöller’s famous “First they came…” statement remains a powerful testament to the ability of people to let tyranny happen. But while it gives a nod to the persecution of socialists, labor activists and Jews, it omits the fact that sexual minorities — LGBT people and those who don’t conform to the gender binary — were among the first groups to be rounded up by the Nazis.

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