Changing Attitudes

A letter to the editor of the New York Jewish Week regarding its latest pro-LGBT articles says that legalizing gay marriage should not mean that Orthodox Jews, Catholics
 and Evangelical Christians should now be
 marginalized instead.

Your various articles regarding
the gay pride parade, the Supreme Court
ruling on same-sex marriage, and the JONAH verdicts prompt the
following reaction.

First, the presence [at the parade] of a woman
 dressed up as male yeshiva student shows utter disrespect for the Orthodox 
community. Whether she likes it or not, that
 community has a right to have its beliefs respected, whether one agrees with them or not.

Secondly, there have already been effects
 regarding the legitimization of gay marriage. 
We have seen florist and bakers fined for
 refusal to serve a gay wedding; said refusals
 were due to the vendor’s religious beliefs 
(Catholic and Evangelical Christian). Are 
the spokesmen for Freedom to Marry now 
going to force kosher catering halls to host
 same-sex marriages? Are they going to
 advocate abolition of tax-exempt status 
for those yeshivot that refuse to admit 
children of same-sex couples?

Third, JONAH is an 
organization based on a dubious assumption 
that you can somehow change sexual orientation
 with the therapy, [claims that the court ruled fraudulent] … . However, my fear is that
 this logic could be extended to treatment offering
 preparation of a conflicted gay individual to a
life of celibacy. This logic would be a crimp on
 religious freedom. 
It is true that the time has come that gays
and lesbians should not be marginalized. However, 
that does not mean that Orthodox Jews, Catholics
 and Evangelical Christians should now be
 marginalized instead.